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Marina Silva

markruffalo:

Hello All,

It has come to my attention that the Brazilian Candidate for President, Marina Silva, may be against gay marriage. That would put me in direct conflict with her. As you know I have fought for marriage equality in my country and see it as a reflection of the quality of a candidate. I did not know this was her stand on this issue when I made the video supporting her.  I only saw her debate where she said she supported gay marriage and have come to find out after the fact that her party has pulled her support of this issue. I can not, in good conscience, support a candidate who takes a hard right approach to issues such as Gay Marriage and Reproductive rights even if that candidate is willing to do the right thing on environmental issues.

I am not an expert on Brazilian politics but I can say that Women’s Rights, Gay Rights and Environmental Rights are all part in parcel to a kind of world view that I ascribe to. To have a world view that does not include all three of those positions makes it impossible for me to endorse a particular candidate.

I have to apologize for not doing a better job of vetting this decision. I apologize if I have let anyone down or made them feel somehow I had done an about face on those issues that I clearly have made an effort to confront and fight.

At this time it would be good to know definitively where Candidate Silva stands on these issues and in no uncertain terms. It is a little bit murky and unclear presently. Until that time, based on what I have been able to glean from the few posts here, and what is available on the internet, I am withdrawing my endorsement. I would ask that her campaign would not use my video endorsement until they either state their support for gay marriage and the reproductive rights of women or make it clear where they stand on these important issues. Short of that my support is null and void.

I apologize to the Silva campaign for not having a better handle on their policies and creating this inconvenience. I was disappointed to see her support for gay marriage be dropped by her party the day after she gave it in a speech. I ask that you honor my wishes in good faith.

Sincerely

Mark Ruffalo

In the old days, NFL owners were rich men who accepted the risk of losing money as the cost of doing business. Thanks to the popularity of the game, the NFL and its owners—with the collusion of politicians—have created what amounts to a risk-free business environment. According to Long’s data, a dozen teams received more public money than they needed to build their facilities. Rather than going into debt, they turned a profit.

The perfect example: Seven of every ten dollars spent to build CenturyLink Field in Seattle came from the taxpayers of Washington State, $390 million total. The owner, Paul Allen, pays the state $1 million per year in “rent” and collects most of the $200 million generated. If you are wondering how to become, like Allen, one of the richest humans on earth, negotiating such a lease would be a good start.

In New Orleans, taxpayers have bankrolled roughly a billion dollars to build then renovate the Superdome, which we are now supposed to call the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Guess who gets nearly all the revenues generated by Saints games played in this building? If you guessed all those hard-working stiffs who paid a billion dollars, you would be wrong. If you guessed billionaire owner Tom Benson, you would be right. He also receives $6 million per annum from the state as an “inducement payment” to keep him from moving the team.

That’s the same amount Cowboys owner Jerry Jones would pay each year in property taxes to Arlington, Texas, where his fancy new stadium is located. Except that Jones doesn’t pay property taxes because, like many of his fellow plutocrats, he’s cut a sweetheart deal with the local authorities.

Why Being a Football Fan Is Indefensible (via kenyatta)

Public funding of stadiums and arenas makes me so goddamn angry.

(via wilwheaton)

All the roles I’ve ever gotten, they’ve been wonderful, but so many have been down-trotting. [Whoopi Goldberg begins to lowly snicker in agreement because she’s had similar roles]. They’ve been women who are pretty much asexual. They haven’t been realized. They have careers but no names. So all of a sudden I was given the opportunity to play someone sexy, mysterious, someone complicated. It was a chance to use my craft, a chance to transform, a chance to surprise myself and the public. And I took it.

I know so many actors in their careers—in the 70s, 80s—fantastic actresses of color who have never been given the opportunity. I’m just so thankful it came to me at this point in my life. [Rosie Perez chimes in that Viola is intelligent, fierce, and sexy in the show].

Listen, I see myself as those things, but I have very rarely seen people who are a physical manifestation of me on the screen. When I was younger it was people like Cicely Tyson and Diahann Carroll who made me believe that I could do it. Then somewhere along the line they disappeared…

I’m glad that Shonda Rhimes saw me. She SAW me. She took me in when I interviewed with Oprah and I said, ‘No one’s ever going to cast me in a sexy role’ and Shonda looked at that interview and said, ‘Well, why not?’ I’m glad she said, ‘Why not?’ I think that’s what makes her a visionary, that’s why she’s special, that’s what makes her iconic.

[Whoopi Goldberg goes back the part of ‘she saw me’ and uses it as a segue to bring up the NY Times article that called Shonda Rhimes ‘an angry black woman’ and referred to Viola Davis as being ‘less classically beautiful than typical tv stars.’]

Beauty is subjective. I’ve heard that statement my entire life that being a dark skinned, black woman. [Whoopi Goldberg mmm hmms in agreement.] You hear it from the time you come out of the womb. Classically not beautiful is a fancy term of saying ugly, and denouncing you, erasing you. Now it worked when I was younger. It no longer works for me now.

It’s like Ruby Dee said, she wanted that hard to get beauty that comes from within—strength courage, and dignity. So many black women came out after that article and used the hashtag to show their face and step into who they are because they’re teaching a culture how to treat them and how to see them.

Really at the end of the day, you define you.

Viola Davis on The View

image

(via thechanelmuse)

I’m ready

(via sydney-a-belle)

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